Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury treatment

Why is my baby's arm not moving?

​If your child has suffered an Obstetric Brachial Plexus injruy, an experienced pediatric physiotherapist at Active Solution Physiotherapy Verdun will develop a treatment plan specifically for your your child.

WHAT IS IT?

The Brachial Plexus is a network of nerves that stems from the neck and travels down the shoulder. OBPI refers to injury to the Brachial Plexus that occurs during birth, it can also be known as Newborn Brachial Plexus Palsy.
The most obvious sign that there is an injury to the Brachial is if your one of your child's arm appears paralyzed and doesn't move like the other.

FACTORS RISK

Certain things can put your child more at risk for OBPI such as:

Birth weight greater than 4.5kg (10 lbs)

Difficult delivery of shoulder

Difficult vaginal delivery

Breech birth

Diabetes during pregnancy

HOW CAN PHYSIO HELP?

Children can be seen by an experienced Active Solution Physiotherapy Verdun pediatric physiotherapist in the weeks, months or years after the initial injury. With a thorough examination of your child's active and passive arm movements, the current level of function can be determined and limitations can be dealt with. In the first few weeks following the injury, the arm should be protected, but gentle range of motion exercises can be done to keep the joints healthy. The primary goal in physiotherapy is to regain arm movement and strength so that your child can participate in activities without limitation.

Treatment Options

Clinics

Song, Kit M MD, Staheli, Lynn T MD. (2007). Pediatric Orthopaedic Secrets, 3rd edition. Philadelphia: Elsevier Inc. Campbell, S. Vander Linden, D. Palisano, R. (2006). Physical Therapy for Children, 3rd edition. St. Louis: Elsevier Inc.

Campbell, S. Vander Linden, D. Palisano, R. (2006). Physical Therapy for Children, 3rd edition. St. Louis: Elsevier Inc.
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